Brewer’s 51: Basketball as it was meant to be

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Credit: Unknown.

I know this is late. Like, five days late. But I still wanted to do something on the Rockets-Timberwolves game from Friday night. It was one of the weirdest games I had ever witnessed, and I was there for it no less. As weird as it was, it was also one of the most pleasurable games I have ever been a part of. For one night we got a reprieve from the widespread disappointment over the team’s season and the trepidation over their future.

First off, there were all of the injuries. For the Timberwolves, Kevin Martin, Nikola Pekovic, Kevin Love and Chase Budinger were all out. For the Rockets, Dwight Howard and Patrick Beverley were no-go’s. You could say bench play was going to be a determining factor, but really, it was all bench play. And despite the fact that there were so many players missing, the score after the first quarter was 39-32…Timberwolves. Yeah, this thing was going to make no sense.

The Timberwolves eventually won, of course, because sometimes basketball makes no sense, but that doesn’t tell the whole story. Dante Cunningham had 20 points and 13 rebounds, Ricky Rubio had a double-double, and Gorgui Dieng finished with 12 points and 20 rebounds (including 10 offensive rebounds, thanks Dwight!)

Yet, none of those performances were the most noteworthy, somehow. This night belonged to Corey Brewer and his 51 points. Brewer rocketed out of the gate and never let up, scrapping his way for point after point, ¬†converting several free throws, and draining a halfcourt shot. Having not watched every 50-point game in NBA history, this was probably the most unorthodox, given Brewer’s skillset.

At the same time, it really isn’t much different than any other. Whether it’s Steph Curry launching threes, Durant doing Durant things or LeBron being otherworldly; these players focus on what they do best and use that to their advantage. And when you take Brewer’s performance into consideration, is it really any different?

As Brewer’s point total continued to climb, the surprisingly filled arena became louder and louder. He roared through the 20′s, and when he charged through the 30′s, everyone clamored for him to touch the ball on each possession hoping he would hit the next milestone. Once he hit 40, the bench and the fans alike were on their feet to cheer him on. The score hardly mattered since everyone was enjoying themselves. It was really the essence of why we watch, or should watch, the game: for fun.

Too often in this season people have forgotten that basketball is meant to be enjoyed. Sure, the playoffs were the goal and they fell short, but the team still improved and will likely finish with their first .500 record in almost 10 years. That’s something to be happy about. On Friday night, none of that mattered. No one was worried about what Love what do in a year, missing the playoffs or whether Dieng or Pekovic should be starting.

Everyone in the building found joy in Brewer’s achievement. There were smiles all down the bench, and Rubio even jumped on Brewer after the game. There was an apparent camaraderie from everyone on the bench– a far cry from the disjointed locker room from early in the year. Really, it was a moment we all had to appreciate. How many 50-point games do we get to witness? After all, there are two in franchise history. More than that, Brewer tied Love’s record for points in a game, but set the record for points in regulation on top of getting the win.

I don’t know that I’ll ever get to see someone of Brewer’s stature hit that milestone again, but I’m sure glad I was there. Most of all, it served as a reminder how basketball is meant to be viewed: enjoyed.